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Notting Hill London guide

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Notting Hill London guide

It’s a little bit terrifying when you stop and think about how much time has passed since Hugh Grant brought fame to Notting Hill London. That floppy hair and those awkward yet ado ...

It’s a little bit terrifying when you stop and think about how much time has passed since Hugh Grant brought fame to Notting Hill London. That floppy hair and those awkward yet adorable advances towards the gorgeous Julia Roberts put this London district on the map and now groups of adoring fans take the walking tour in the hope that Hugh might still be there.
Bike in the rain

Photo credit: Kayo Julio Cesar Pereira on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/kayojcp/14316974055

There is a lot more Notting Hill than just Hugh Grant! Head here to discover great restaurants and bars, a happening nightlife, high-end shopping and one of London’s best markets. Despite a sordid history, Notting Hill has transformed into one of the fancier, more desired districts of London with an influx of some of the city’s rich and famous. Notting Hill really is a hill with its summit around Ladbroke Grove. So if you feel like living the high life, check out the scene in Notting Hill. A comfortable, fashionable place to live and a fun place to visit – there’s something for everyone.
Walker and dog in park

Photo credit: Ronan Duffaud on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/99858207@N08/14121114002

On a Map

Notting Hill is located in the borough of Kensington and Chelsea, in the north-west of the city. The main tube station is Notting Hill Gate, which is easily accessible via the Central, Circle and District Lines, or you could catch one of the many buses that frequent the area. It is a short walk from Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park and you could even nip over a visit the Queen at Buckingham Palace.

A little bit of history

Notting Hill hasn’t always been a hangout for celebrities and politicians – less than 50 years ago it was one of the most run down areas of London. During the nineteenth century, Notting Hill was a rural and industrial area known for its clay and pig farms, earning it the nickname “The Piggeries and Potteries”. A decline in industry during the twentieth century saw most of the houses in the area transformed into multiple occupancy dwellings and after the Second World War the standards of living were so low that Notting Hill became a slum. Notting Hill was populated by many immigrants from the West Indies plus artists and creative types also began to move in, making it one of the most diverse areas of London. Since the 1980s, the area has become incredibly gentrified and is now considered to be one of the most exclusive areas of the capital. Gentrification has unfortunately forced out many of the former residents and creative types, pricing them out of the area and thus losing some of its former diversity and “credibility”.  As older businesses closed, the demand for new businesses, restaurants and boutique shops began to create a different type of Notting Hill. The area is still known for its colourful houses and famous Notting Hill Carnival (now a gathering of all Londoners, generally peacefully, from every class, race and creed) which is a staple in the diary of most Londoners!  
Street scape in Notting Hill

Photo credit: jhlau on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/jhlau/10292044533

Cost of living

Since its upgrade, Notting Hill has become one of the most desired areas of London to live in. As a result, prices have risen but as has the quality of housing. There is a large mix of accommodation options in the area from apartment blocks to beautiful Victorian terrace houses. It is a largely residential district with a lot of families living in the area. Lowest rental prices for a decent two bedroom flat cost around £450 per week Highest rental prices for a two bedroom flat cost around £1,300 per week  
Flat window in Notting Hill

Photo credit: Simone Merli on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/simonemerli/1283713155

Where to Eat and Drink

 Hummingbird Bakery

One word: cupcakes. Big ones, small ones (no wait, who wants small cupcakes?), icing, sugar, sprinkles, sugar, sugar… Hummingbird Bakery’s delicious goodies have become world famous and you can visit their original store in Notting Hill’s Portobello Markets. Go and treat yourself – cake is good for the soul.
Address: 133 Portobello Road 
Notting Hill, London 
W11 2DY
Telephone: 020 7851 1795
Hummingbird bakery cupcake

Photo credit: Knar Bedian on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/hyekab25/6596410025

The Ledbury

For those looking for something a little bit special and wanting to sample some of Britain’s most prized gastronomic delights, book a table at the two Michelin starred Ledbury restaurant. Head chef, Brett Graham, and his highly skilled team present a menu that will impress even the choosiest of taste buds.
Address: 127 Ledbury Road 
Notting Hill, London
 W11 2AQ
Telephone: 020 7792 9090

The Churchill Arms

Come here for an after work pint and stay on for a bite from their interesting and exceptionally tasty Thai food menu. A great range of curries, noodles and rice dishes are whipped up and served in their butterfly-themed conservatory. Yes, butterflies.
Address: 119 Kensington Church Street, Notting Hill, London W8 7LN
Telephone: 020 7727 4242

The Electric Diner

You can start your day here with a hearty breakfast, stay for lunch, and keep on going for dinner and party into the wee-hours with drinks and a bit of dancing. The Electric Diner caters for all of your eating and drinking needs, no matter what time of day. Serving Franco-American style food and a great range of drinks, this ain’t your average diner – it’s electric!
Address: 191 Portobello Road,
 London, W11 2ED
Telephone: 020 7908 9696
People in street

Photo credit: robertsharp on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/robertsharp59/7883535488/

The Shed

It is hard to go past these handsome brothers, Oliver and Richard Gladwin, with their homely and wholesome food. Their regularly changing menu consists of dishes featuring ingredients sourced from their younger brother’s farm in Sussex and other local suppliers. Everything you eat and drink in this restaurant is grown, prepared and served with love. And that’s why so many people love The Shed.
Address: 122 Palace Gardens Terrace Notting Hill, London, W8 4RT
Telephone: 0207 229 4024

Crazy Homies

For some people, the word ‘tequila’ brings up horrible memories of that night in first year university. For others, it just sounds like a seriously good time and that’s where Crazy Homies is the place to be. Serving a huge selection of tequilas, plus your usual array of alcoholic beverages, this is where the party’s at. You can soak up some of that alcohol with some Mexican fare – tacos, enchiladas and burritos are on offer with a wide range of fillings and spicy flavours.
Address: 125 Westbourne Park Road Notting Hill, London, W2 5QL
Telephone: 020 7727 6771

Granger and Co

Australian restaurateur and food writer Bill Granger has brought his talents to London with his immensely popular Granger and Co, where there is always be a queue outside the door for brunch on Saturday and Sunday. Granger and Co is situated on Notting Hill’s beautiful Westbourne Grove, amongst cool designer shops and cute cafes. It’s almost impossible to find better pancakes in the city and the famous ricotta pancakes with banana and honeycomb butter bring brunchers from far and wide. Their popular whipped scrambled eggs certainly look incredible (but can be a little bland) and everything else on the menu is fresh, interesting, healthy and cool – just like a good Australian should be.
Address: 175 Westbourne Grove, London W11 2SB
Telephone: 020 7229 9111

Beach Blanket Babylon

The owners of this wonderfully kooky establishment have – oddly – encapsulated the three unrelated words of their name in the design and feel of their Notting Hill bar.  It’s been decorated in a playful way and will transport you far from London with its colourfully tiled interior, sucessfully mixing Middle Eastern decadence and classic French sophistication. The lower levels are cosy, like entering a secret jewelled cavern with comfy chairs and wooden walkways, and the cocktails here are definitely beachy.
Address: 45 Ledbury Road, Notting Hill, London, W11 2AA
Telephone: 020 7229 2907
 

Shops in Notting Hill and other things to do

Notting Hill Carnival

Every year since 1965 over the August bank holiday weekend, Notting Hill comes alive with Caribbean colours, music, dancing, food and vibes. The Notting Hill Carnival is one of London’s most popular annual events, celebrating Afro-Caribbean culture in the city. Get out your feathers and glitter – this street party is not to be missed and it is guaranteed to get your hips swinging. When: Sunday and Monday of the August bank holiday weekend. Be sure to check changes to public transport as some Tube stations are closed during Carnival.
Street filled with people

Photo credit: Simone Merli on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/simonemerli/1285267297

Portobello Road Market Dating back to the 1800s, the Portobello Road Market has evolved and changed throughout the years and is now one of London’s hippest markets. You will find a little bit of everything here – antiques, posters, vintage clothes and food – with over 1000 dealers there is a great assortment of shops and stalls. The main market days are Friday and Saturday but there is a smaller market open throughout the week.
Address: Portobello Road, 72 Tavistock Road Notting Hill, London, W11 1AN
Telephone: 020 7727 7684

Bankrobber Gallery

Bankrobber Gallery is an independent, small, cosy, edgy gallery showcasing the art of some of the best young talent London has to offer. It’s particularly known for displaying works of elusive street-graffiti artist Banksy. The nearest tube stop is Ladbroke Grove.

Shopping

If you need some retail therapy then Notting Hill is a great place to go. From favourites like Space NK for beauty and Kurt Geiger for shoes, you’ll find up-market boutiques along Westborne Grove and other popular retail outlets like American Apparel mixed in with charity and vintage shops. Do you have any more favourite hang outs in Notting Hill? Well LET US KNOW in the comments below and why. We’re always updating the blog so it’s great to get some tips 🙂 thanks guys!      

As content manager for Movebubble, it’s my job to be an expert on renting and London. Being a writer (Journalism BA Bournemouth University) with a passion for food and the arts, I definitely have my dream job! I love exploring the city and researching the latest information and news to bring to our readers. I love getting recommendations from readers on their favourite spots in London so if you have one, let us know in the comments!

Comments ( 3 )

  1. Replypsychotherapy Notting Hill
    Great post! Thanks for sharing this one well done such amazing pic and atmosphere there in Notting hills, Thanks again..
  2. ReplyAndre
    Hi, I am currently dong a research in terraced houses. Notting Hill is one of my favourite areas in London. Unfortunately I have not been able to find the history of the multi-coloured row of houses. It would be great you could include on the website information about the reason these houses were painted like that, who started the trend or when were they painted. I have found in few blogs people asking for these information, but I have not yet find the history of these colourful houses of Notting Hill. I would appreciate if you could help me with this information. Andre
    • Jamie Gough
      Hey Andre, As far as I know, there is no real reason behind why the houses in Notting Hill are painted the way they are. I wish I could provide something more but there isn't anything that I can find out about it. I believe it was just the choice of the house owners, who decided to paint their homes! Sorry I couldn't help further, Jamie

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